News

AMMPI researchers use first-of-its kind process to develop wear and corrosion resistant alloys

Corrosion and wear are very common – they can happen to any material exposed to an environment. But, what if materials could be tested at the atomic level to determine exactly how and why they break down and then be improved to create ultra-high performance alloys? Researchers at the University of North Texas have done just that – and are designing next generation alloys that could be used in bio-implants or even outer space. Their study was recently published in Scientific Reports.

AMMPI researchers create environmentally friendly, more efficient replacement for lithium ion batteries

DENTON (UNT), Texas — Lithium-ion batteries power some of the most used electronics, including smartphones, laptops, tablets and electric cars. Researchers at the University of North Texas College of Engineering have developed a higher-power, longer-life, environmentally-friendly lithium-sulfur alternative that could replace the lithium-ion battery. Their research has been published in the Nature Nanotechnology journal.

UNT materials faculty visit ARL as part of collaborative partnership

Nearly a dozen professors from the University of North Texas toured the Weapons and Materials Manufacturing Directorate of the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) facilities Jan. 18-19.

The visit was part of the special relationship afforded members of ARL South, a cooperative effort based in Austin, Texas, bringing together government, industry and academia.

UNT researchers develop material that could lead to next-generation, ultra-thin electronic devices

 University of North Texas researchers in the College of Engineering’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering have created a uniform, thin, two-dimensional material that could revolutionize materials science. Their research has been published in Nature’s “Scientific Reports” journal.

AMMPI researchers make discovery that could revolutionize the future of materials science

Researchers at the University of North Texas College of Engineering’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering have found a way to create an ultralight, highly heat-resistant, magnesium-based material by engineering bonds at an atomic level. Their research has been published in the “Nature Communications” journal.

AMMPI Faculty awarded $900,000 grant

The Air Force Office of Scientific Research has awarded University Distinguished Research Professor and AMMPI's faculty Dr. Raj Banerjee from the UNT College of Engineering and his research group a $900,000 grant. The funds will be used to develop and investigate multi-phase high entropy alloys – also referred to as complex-concentrated alloys – that are expected to revolutionize aircraft construction.

AMMPI Faculty partnering with Indian Institute of Technology for bioimplant longevity research

As the population age 65 and older in the U.S. – and the world – grows, so does the need for bioimplants, such as artificial knees and hips, dental prosthetics and cardiovascular devices. Implant surgeries can be taxing on older demographics who tend to take longer to recover, and once a bioimplant is inserted, there’s no guarantee it will last. Sundeep Mukherjee, University of North Texas associate professor of materials science and engineering, wants to change that.

UNT awarded almost $2 million in NSF funding to study the rules of physics

Can engineering change the basic laws of physics? That is one of the questions three professors and a former student at the University of North Texas are attempting to answer.

Arup Neogi, a professor in the College of Science’s Department of Physics, is the principal investigator on a $1,997,222 National Science Foundation grant that will explore such questions.

AMMPI engineer's research looks beyond paint, metals and ceramics

A UNT materials scientist is investigating a secret underneath the final layer of paint on Alessandro Allori's Portrait of Grand Duchess Bianca Capello de Medici with Her Son. The portrait, which was painted more than 500 years ago, is one piece of a story about a controversial royal family. The painting currently is being treated and studied by Paintings Conservation Fellow Laura Hartman in the Dallas Museum of Art's visible conservation studio.

Pages